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Integration across sciences highest priority for Norway’s IPCC candidate

News - News from CICERO

Published 30.09.2015

Dr. Jan S. Fuglestvedt, an atmospheric scientist with an interdisciplinary background, wants to make IPCC reports more policy relevant by boosting collaboration across sciences and the Panel’s working groups.

 

Dr. Jan S. Fuglestvedt, an atmospheric scientist with an interdisciplinary background, wants to make IPCC reports more policy relevant by boosting collaboration across sciences and the Panel’s working groups.

Dr. Fuglestvedt is research director at CICERO, a Norwegian interdisciplinary climate research institute. He specializes in emissions, atmospheric chemistry and climate interactions, and he contributed extensively to the IPCCs Fifth Assessment Report. These days he is busy preparing for next week’s IPCC meeting in Croatia as candidate for Vice-Chair of IPCCs Working Groups I and III. Dr. Fuglestvedt is nominated by the Norwegian government for the elections held at the Dubrovnik plenary session Oct. 5-8.

“Integration is not something we can fix in the Synthesis Report. It must start at the beginning.”

Dr. Jan Fuglestvedt, Norway’s IPCC candidate

Norway’s IPCC focal point, Øyvind Christophersen at the Norwegian Environment Agency, said Dr. Fuglestvedt possesses two important qualities for the Vice-Chair position.

“Jan S. Fuglestvedt is an internationally respected climate scientist, concerned with asking crucial and relevant questions, rigorous testing of answers and safeguarding scientific integrity. He also knows how to make the science relevant for policy makers.”

For the Fifth Assessment Report, Fuglestvedt was an author for Working Groups I and III and member of the Core Writing Team for the Synthesis Report. He participated at three report approval meetings since he actively contributed to the Summary for Policymakers for WGI, WGIII and the Synthesis Report.

“As research director at CICERO, Dr. Fuglestvedt has a proven track record of working across scientific disciplines, heading multi-disciplinary research groups with an extensive network of international collaborators. This is particularly valuable as a working group Vice-Chair,” said Christophersen.

 

If elected, Dr. Fuglestvedt would like to improve the interaction and integration across the working groups.

“Integration is not something we can fix in the Synthesis Report. It must start at the beginning.”

“Better exchange of knowledge among the working groups will strengthen the assessment, the relevance of the results and the communications with stakeholders. It will increase consistency of data, perspectives, results and assumptions of reports,” said Fuglestvedt.

“Even within the individual working groups, the need for interaction across disciplines is increasing as climate science is becoming extremely complex.”

“Jan S. Fuglestvedt is an internationally respected climate scientist (..) He also knows how to make the science relevant for policy makers.”

Norway’s IPCC focal point, Øyvind Christophersen at the Norwegian Environment Agency

Dr. Fuglestvedt learned a lot from presenting his own research as well as IPCC reports to professional audiences such as policy makers and leaders in finance and business.

“There’s something they all have in common: They all have very specific, precise questions about the most crucial policy-relevant questions, and they need answers they can understand,” said Fuglestvedt, who did outreach activities for the IPCC in Norway and internationally, often in close collaboration with authors from WGII and WGIII.

“There’s an ongoing effort to improve the IPCC’s communication which I support wholeheartedly. It is essential that the reports present the science in a useful way to politicians, governments, businesses and society.”

Fuglestvedt is the first researcher from CICERO to be nominated to the Bureau of the IPCC. CICERO’s director, Kristin Halvorsen, sees the nomination as an important recognition of CICEROs extensive contributions to the IPCC.

“Fourteen of our researchers were involved in the latest assessment which makes CICERO the largest IPCC contributor in the Nordic countries,” said Halvorsen.

“The nomination is an acknowledgement of Dr. Fuglestvedt as a researcher and communicator, and of CICERO as an environment for interdisciplinary climate research.”