CICERO - Center for International Climate Research
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Understanding the trends and drivers of historical and future emissions of greenhouse gases and short-lived climate forcers.

Recent news

Indian prime minister Modi is re-elected. What now for climate policy and mitigation?

India is the world’s third largest emitter of greenhouse gases and is set to become the world’s most populous country by 2025, thus it is by sheer size one of the most important actors in global climate governance. What will five new years of Modi/BJP government mean for climate policy and measures?

10 takeaways from the IEA Global Energy & CO₂ Status Report

Energy use grew 2.3% in 2018, energy-related CO₂ emissions 1.7%

 

Methane: a climate blind spot?

Methane is one of the greenhouse gases that contribute most to global warming. Recent research show that its levels are increasing, and the researchers don’t know why.

Population growth is moving in a climate-friendly direction

Higher living standards have led to a slow-down in global population growth. This is good news for the climate because it will lead to lower growth in carbon emissions, say scientists at CICERO Center for International Climate Research.

Global CO2 emissions rise again in 2018, according to latest data

Global CO2 emissions are on track to rise more than 2% in 2018 on the back of renewed growth in coal use, and continued growth in oil and gas use, according to data released on 5 December. 

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Highlighted publications

Key indicators to track current progress and future ambition of the Paris Agreement

Glen Peters, Robbie Andrew, Josep G. Canadell, Sabine Fuss, Robert B. Jackson, Jan Ivar Korsbakken, Corinne Le Quéré, Nebosja Nakicenovic

Uncertainties around reductions in China's coal use and CO 2 emissions

Jan Ivar Korsbakken, Glen Peters, Robbie Andrew

Growth in emission transfers via international trade from 1990 to 2008

Glen Peters, Jan Minx, Christopher L Weber, Ottmar Edenhofer

Rapid Response for Energy and Climate Policy Analysis

The world today is moving fast and so are user needs. Research projects can take years to develop and get funded, but many research questions in climate policy are relevant on short time scales. We believe there is an opportunity to fill a research niche answering contemporary policy challenges through synthesis of current knowledge and through fusion of existing data and methods.

Global Carbon Project

The Global Carbon Project was formed in 2001 to help the international science community to establish a common, mutually agreed knowledge base that supports policy debate and action to slow the rate of increase of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.